Making History

Making History The central character of this play is Hugh O Neill Earl of Tyrone who led an Irish and Spanish alliance against the armies of Elizabeth I in an attempt to drive the English out of Ireland The action

  • Title: Making History
  • Author: Brian Friel
  • ISBN: 9780571154777
  • Page: 421
  • Format: Paperback
  • The central character of this play is Hugh O Neill, Earl of Tyrone, who led an Irish and Spanish alliance against the armies of Elizabeth I in an attempt to drive the English out of Ireland The action takes place before and after the Battle of Kinsale, at which the alliance was defeated with O Neill at home in Dungannon, as a fugitive in the mountains, and finally exiledThe central character of this play is Hugh O Neill, Earl of Tyrone, who led an Irish and Spanish alliance against the armies of Elizabeth I in an attempt to drive the English out of Ireland The action takes place before and after the Battle of Kinsale, at which the alliance was defeated with O Neill at home in Dungannon, as a fugitive in the mountains, and finally exiled in Rome In his handling of this momentous episode Brian Friel has avoided the conventions of historical drama to produce a play about history, the continuing process.

    • Best Read [Brian Friel] Ü Making History || [Music Book] PDF ↠
      421 Brian Friel
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      Published :2020-01-21T07:54:18+00:00


    About “Brian Friel

    • Brian Friel

      Brian Friel is a playwright and, recently, director of his own works from Ireland who now resides in County Donegal.Friel was born in Omagh County Tyrone, the son of Patrick Paddy Friel, a primary school teacher and later a borough councillor in Derry, and Mary McLoone, postmistress of Glenties, County Donegal Ulf Dantanus provides the most detail regarding Friel s parents and grandparents, see Books below He received his education at St Columb s College in Derry and the seminary at St Patrick s College, Maynooth 1945 48 from which he received his B.A then he received his teacher s training at St Mary s Training College in Belfast, 1949 50 He married Anne Morrison in 1954, with whom he has four daughters and one son they remain married From 1950 until 1960, he worked as a Maths teacher in the Derry primary and intermediate school system, until taking leave in 1960 to live off his savings and pursue a career as writer In 1966, the Friels moved from 13 Malborough Street, Derry to Muff, County Donegal, eventually settling outside Greencastle, County Donegal.He was appointed to the Irish Senate in 1987 and served through 1989 In 1989, BBC Radio launched a Brian Friel Season , a series devoted a six play season to his work, the first living playwright to be so distinguished In 1999 April August , Friel s 70th birthday was celebrated in Dublin with the Friel Festival during which ten of his plays were staged or presented as dramatic readings throughout Dublin in conjunction with the festival were a conference, National Library exhibition, film screenings, outreach programs, pre show talks, and the launching of a special issue of The Irish University Review devoted to the playwright in 1999, he also received a lifetime achievement award from the Irish Times.On 22 January 2006 Friel was presented with a gold Torc by President Mary McAleese in recognition of the fact that the members of Aosd na have elected him a Saoi Only five members of Aosd na can hold this honour at any one time and Friel joined fellow Saoithe Louis leBrocquy, Benedict Kiely d 2007 , Seamus Heaney and Anthony Cronin On acceptance of the gold Torc, Friel quipped, I knew that being made a Saoi, really getting this award, is extreme unction it is a final anointment Aosdana s last rites In November 2008, Queen s University of Belfast announced its intention to build a new theatre complex and research center to be named The Brian Friel Theatre and Centre for Theatre Research.



    240 thoughts on “Making History


    • Yeahhhhh, what a fun, engaging read this was From our '21 USES FOR BRIAN FRIEL'S MAKING HISTORY [WITHOUT EVER READING IT!]' list made back in '06 when we had to study this, one to sum this play in particular:'7. Suicide method - oh shit, wait; you have to read it'Redeeming quality: somehow retaining just enough knowledge of that period in history to reference Flight of the Earls in conversation years into the future, impressing business dinner attendees, thus ensuring your manager gave a good re [...]


    • This is infuriatingly hard to find (at least the Samuel French edition, which is what I need). I found it online, but it cuts off somewhere in the first act. I was just starting to get into it, too. Bollocks.I had only given this two stars because the characters were not entirely likeable and, since I skimmed it a bit, I got kind of confused with who was speaking and who was who for a lot of the first act. But upon finishing it I think that I really liked it. I quite enjoyed O'Neil's unabashed h [...]


    • Although Beckett may be my favorite writer, and he is best known for his plays, it's his novels that grip me - my favorite playwrite has become Brian Friel. This play is a brilliant simultaneous celebration and criticism of Ireland, set in the 1590's and making use of historical characters, the play centers on the ideas of Irish self-identity among those that made it what it is. A quick, well written and fascinating work.


    • Okay, so I really don't want to write a bad review but this play is not for me. I had to read this play as part of my English Literature course and whilst I do find the metaphors and interpretation of certain parts of the text very interesting, I generally found the text to be slow and quite draining to read. Maybe a re-read might change my opinion?


    • I might be teaching this next year so i read it in a hurry. But i liked it because it wasnt as dry as the concept suggested [a bit like translations]. an interesting interchange between characters and left you with an increased interest in irish history which can only be a good thing. reminded me of saint joan by george bernard shaw.


    • Upon having to read this title for my English Lit. AS I am very glad it is over personally I found it boring only reward in it was the accents some people in class put on I don't recommend this book unless you are into Irish History *snore*


    • "People think that they just want to know the 'facts'; they think they believe in some sort of empirical truth, but what they really want is a story." Really enjoyed this play, it surprised me.


    • An enjoyable read that taught me something new as well as giving me an idea as to what life might have been like for O'Neill during his final days.



    • Had to read for AS English Literature, I enjoyed the basic plot and message of the play but was not keen on all of the politics (couldn't understand all of it SO CONDENSED!!!!!!!)




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