The Fatal Impact

The Fatal Impact Moorehead has followed up his fascinating trek into Africa The Blue Nile The White Nile with a short but equally elegant account of the invasion of the South Pacific The hero here of co

  • Title: The Fatal Impact
  • Author: Alan Moorehead
  • ISBN: 9780141390291
  • Page: 258
  • Format: Paperback
  • Moorehead has followed up his fascinating trek into Africa The Blue Nile The White Nile , with a short, but equally elegant account of the invasion of the South Pacific, 1761 1840 The hero here, of course, is Captain James Cook, with Moorehead concentrating on the voyage to Tahiti, New Zealand Australia, the later exploration of the Antarctic Circle Moorehead has followed up his fascinating trek into Africa The Blue Nile The White Nile , with a short, but equally elegant account of the invasion of the South Pacific, 1761 1840 The hero here, of course, is Captain James Cook, with Moorehead concentrating on the voyage to Tahiti, New Zealand Australia, the later exploration of the Antarctic Circle the South Pole As acknowledged, he s drawn heavily on the historian J.C Beaglehole s definitive volumes, as well as from other weighty sources But this should not dismay the layman He has the novelist s eye, not only in his firm but sensuous descriptions, but also in his stunning ability to evoke character, interweave various tales, see a Jumble of facts conjectures as a means of releasing whatever dramatic moments are around The confrontation between aggressive Europeans innocent primitive tribes affords ample opportunity The book is a requiem for an idyllic past, moving in its picture of a wild civilization slowly eroding under the impact of commercial progress or geographical expansion, exciting in its interplay of differing psychological attitudes or customs, developed with many crisscrossing references Bougainville Banks, Melville Gauguin, the Bounty mutiny the little known efforts of the Englishwoman Daisy Bates to save the Aborigines A lovely, sophisticated work Kirkus edited

    • Best Read [Alan Moorehead] ↠ The Fatal Impact || [Memoir Book] PDF ¹
      258 Alan Moorehead
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Alan Moorehead] ↠ The Fatal Impact || [Memoir Book] PDF ¹
      Posted by:Alan Moorehead
      Published :2019-06-05T13:20:10+00:00


    About “Alan Moorehead

    • Alan Moorehead

      Alan Moorehead was lionised as the literary man of action the most celebrated war correspondent of World War II author of award winning books star travel writer of The New Yorker pioneer publicist of wildlife conservation At the height of his success, his writing suddenly stopped and when, 17 years later, his death was announced, he seemed a heroic figure from the past His fame as a writer gave him the friendship of Ernest Hemingway, George Bernard Shaw and Field Marshall Montgomery and the courtship and marriage of his beautiful wife Lucy Milner After 1945, he turned to writing books, including Eclipse, Gallipoli for which he won the Duff Cooper Prize , The White Nile, The Blue Nile, and finally, A Late Education He was awarded an OBE in 1946, and died in 1983.



    124 thoughts on “The Fatal Impact

    • It's taken me a long time to get to this 1966 classic. But not long to read it once I did. Alan Moorehead has written a great popular history of Cook and subsequently Europe in the Pacific - in Tahiti and the European impact there, in Australia and the European impact there; in Antarctica and the European impact there. A rattling good read; superb use of primary sources, including the freshly released journals of Cook editied by J C Beaglehole. As well as Beaglehole's personal reading and advice [...]


    • We think of Captain Cook as a grand explorer and adventurer living the hero's life. What we don't think of is how his explorations changed the world and continue to affect us all.


    • Fascinating! I knew nothing of the settlement of Australia except they used to send convicts there, and nothing at all about Captain Cook's explorations of the Pacific islands or Antarctica. I'd read and enjoyed Mutiny on the Bounty, Pitcairn's Island, and Men at Sea, and this book filled in all the context of how these events came to happen. I just picked up Moby Dick again, because of the reference to Herman Melville, and was amazed how the background I just learned increased my understanding [...]


    • A gem of a book. This modest effort looks at how the discoveries of white man affected inhabitants of several previously undiscovered parts of the world, principally Tahiti, Australia and Antarctica. The author draws mostly on the journals of Captain James Cook from his three voyages but brings in many sources to flesh out the story. It would be easy to dwell on the negative outcome that you know will be coming but the writing is so clear, well rounded and interesting as well as thoroughly docum [...]



    • Exploration history. Namely what happened in Polynesia, Australia and the Antarctica after Captain Cook made landfall in each. The Tahitians and Aborigines were devastated by European contact and as bad as these are I'm not sure reading about the rape of sea life in Antarctica isn't worse. It's the same old story wherever humans go they hunt wildlife to near extinction if not outright extinction. Moorehead is great on Cook's time in Tahiti and also does justice with Australian explorers Edward E [...]


    • Always great to read about atrocities our European ancestors committed in the name of progress. I remain fascinated by the lives of Cook and Banks, which is what led me to this book in the first place. The history of the early exploration of Australia was rich and deeply interesting. By the end, I'm left with a desire to visit Australia and read Moby Dick. Though not necessarily go to Australia to read Moby Dick.


    • Dad served part of WWII in the Southwest Pacific and my ignorance of the area had long been irksome. Consequently, Moorehead's historical account of the Euro-American penetration of the region seemed like a good place to start. Indeed, it was so good, Moorehead being an excellent narrator, that I went on to read a number of his other books.


    • This was one of my first books on tape. It started me on the path to reading 205 books from BOT from 1985 until BOT went out of business in 2004. The list of 205 actually stops in 2002 so there are probably a few more to find.




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