The Key & Diary of a Mad Old Man

The Key Diary of a Mad Old Man These two modern classics by the great Japanese novelist Junichiro Tanizaki both utilize the diary form to explore the authority that love and sex have over all In The Key a middle aged professor pl

  • Title: The Key & Diary of a Mad Old Man
  • Author: Jun'ichirō Tanizaki Howard Hibbett
  • ISBN: 9781400079001
  • Page: 272
  • Format: Paperback
  • These two modern classics by the great Japanese novelist Junichiro Tanizaki, both utilize the diary form to explore the authority that love and sex have over all.In The Key, a middle aged professor plies his wife of thirty years with any number of stimulants, from brandy to a handsome young lover, in order to reach new heights of pleasure Their alternating diaries recordThese two modern classics by the great Japanese novelist Junichiro Tanizaki, both utilize the diary form to explore the authority that love and sex have over all.In The Key, a middle aged professor plies his wife of thirty years with any number of stimulants, from brandy to a handsome young lover, in order to reach new heights of pleasure Their alternating diaries record their separate adventures, but whether for themselvess or each other becomes the question Diary of a Mad Old Man records, with alternating humor and sadness, seventy seven year old Utsugi s discovery that even his stroke ravaged body still contains a raging libido, especially in the unwitting presence of his chic, mysterious daughter in law.

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      272 Jun'ichirō Tanizaki Howard Hibbett
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      Posted by:Jun'ichirō Tanizaki Howard Hibbett
      Published :2019-04-04T21:51:03+00:00


    About “Jun'ichirō Tanizaki Howard Hibbett

    • Jun'ichirō Tanizaki Howard Hibbett

      Jun ichiro Tanizaki was a Japanese author, one of the major writers of modern Japanese literature, and perhaps the most popular Japanese novelist after Natsume S seki Some of his works present a rather shocking world of sexuality and destructive erotic obsessions others, less sensational, subtly portray the dynamics of family life in the context of the rapid changes in 20th century Japanese society Frequently his stories are narrated in the context of a search for cultural identity in which constructions of the West and Japanese tradition are juxtaposed The results are complex, ironic, demure, and provocative.



    586 thoughts on “The Key & Diary of a Mad Old Man

    • Longing and desire are at the heart of these two short novels, each utilizing a diary format in which the characters write their deepest, darkest & yes, kinkiest yearnings. This is nothing if not a sexy book in a perverse Tanizaki way (i.e. not for everyone). There is a great deal of pathos here (a 77 year old man obsessively longing for his beautiful daughter-in-law, a long-married couple who seem to have no true intimacy - in bed or elsewhere) but there are also several strong doses of dar [...]


    • Opäť som načrel do japonskej literatúry - do obdobia, najskôr, tesne po Druhej svetovej vojne. Sprevádzal ma majster Tanizaki, ktorý mi otvoril posvätné miesto manželského páru: spálňu a mysle manžela a manželky skrz ich denníky. Prostredie prísne tradičné, ovenčené rituálmi a cťou - ktorá sa i tak rušila pod tlakom poznania a vôle, dobré? zlé? ktovie Pán manžel, decentný a uznávaný profesor vo vyššom veku a jeho pani manželka, vychovaná v silne tradičnej a [...]


    • The Key is perhaps the ideal point of entry to the world of Tanizaki; the perfect encapsulation of his themes and style. Employing a twin diary format, The Key oscillates between the private diaries of a middle-aged man (Kenmochi) and his beautiful wife (Ikuko), revealing the perverse relationship they share, along with that of their comparatively unattractive adult daughter (Toshiko) and her would-be lover (Kimura), the true love interest of Ikuko. Kenmochi is getting on in years and no longer [...]



    • Tanizaki is absolutely mesmerizing. Every time I read one of his novels, I walk away feeling as though I have been bewitched by his work. These works were no different. This book is definitely worth a look. It will most assuredly change your outlook on getting older.The Key - This story of a married couple documenting their intimacy in their own diaries was amazing. While the couple wrote their own feelings down, they never actually spoke to each other regarding their desires. Rather, they assum [...]


    • One book, two novellas. Certainly not a unique format, but finding two equally powerful novellas in the same volume is a little out of the ordinary. Junichiro Tanizaki's "The Key and "Diary of a Mad Old Man" are subtlety disturbing psychological portraits of two separate, postwar Japanese families in the throes of sexual metamorphosis and strange, complicit betrayals. The key word here is "complicit."In “The Key,” Ikuko and her husband (unnamed) keep diaries that they suspect each other to b [...]


    • The Key : by time, passions dimmed out. Upon picking up this book, i understand this is about an old man with a certain kinks on sexual stuff. nothing too explicit though, you have to understand that this book is written in the 1900s, where tradition are still being held close to heart. forgot all the sex stuff, there are none of it, which by the way, all these modern books nowadays portrays it in excruciatingly detailed scenes. The author talks about sex and affair, but saying nothing too expli [...]


    • The usual Tanizaki bag of tricks—unreliable, bumbling narrators with unusual fetishes obsessing over women who play them for fools—told through a diary frame. "The Key" has the advantage of being told by two unreliable narrators on opposite ends of the relationship—something similar to what he did in "A Man, A Cat, and Two Women"—but loses something by having a coda that explains everything ambiguous, all the tensions that were deliciously implied. The Mad Old Man only has half the ambig [...]


    • When I picked up "The Key" and "Diary of a Mad Old Man" at the Strand, it was because the plotline sounded vaguely like a post-WWII Japanese novel that I read when I was about 13 or 14, that I have been trying to find ever since. I have a feeling the novel I am looking for is probably by Tanizaki, but these were not the droids I was looking for. Realizing that early in my reading probably put these stories at a disadvantage with me. Nonetheless, I found both stories enjoyable, especially in thei [...]


    • Everyone who saw me reading this book commented on its difficulty. It was anything but difficult. Perhaps people are mislead because it was written a long time ago by an exstremely sex-crazed old man. It is an interesting writting technique, though. A husband and a wife each writting their own diaries in "secret" as they stretch their limits of sexual exploration. Both stories prompt the question: who do we write for? Is it really possible to only write for one's self in a purely unbiases form? [...]


    • Two short and bleak, but blackly humorous novels by Tanizaki involving obsession, voyeurism, Eros and Thanatos, and fetishism, but way more subtle than those themes would imply. Both make good use of the diary form (The Key doing it best with the man and wife both writing diary entries) which reminds me a little of Harry Mathew’s The Journalist and Nabokov’s Pale Fire (annotations taking place of the diary), but these might be superficial similarities.


    • I finally finished "The Key" and "Diary of a Mad Old Man." Both Japanese novellas are about human relationships, power, sexuality, and culture. I loved both stories. They were written (and translated) beautifully, and the characters are subtle, funny, and clever. I also really liked the fact that both novellas are written in a diary format. I'd like to read more of his work.


    • I read the Key last year and finally got around to Diary. The Key was somewhat stronger overall, though the ending didn't work for me. The dual-diary structure was put to good use. Diary of a Mad Old Man was fun. Ultimately it's more about Utsugi's (fully realized) character and coping with old age than his *madness* or perversions, which, in the end, don't go very far.


    • This is a pair of gorgeously written short novels with ailing, lecherous patriarchs as their protagonists. Tanizaki uses shifts in point-of-view to great advantage as he explores the sexual politics of 20th-century Japan.


    • Two novels, both told via diaries. While somewhat metaphorical (both taking place in postwar Japan and containing themes contrasting traditional Japan with newer western culture) the stories on the surface alone are a delight. Straightforward and rich, some good ol' readin'.Also sexual deviancy.


    • Tanizaki captivates for his subtlety, his untold hints.The stories themselves are not that special the way through them might be.



    • Typical Tanizaki. After reading Naomi I knew what to expect but these two short novels were just too much. Men are fools for women.


    • Excellent novellas. Mostly dealt with romance, lust, deceit, cruelty and aging. Like a Japanese Bukowski with more structure.




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