Motherhood, the Elephant in the Laboratory: Women Scientists Speak Out

Motherhood the Elephant in the Laboratory Women Scientists Speak Out About half of the undergraduate and roughly percent of graduate degree recipients in science and engineering are women As increasing numbers of these women pursue research careers in science many

  • Title: Motherhood, the Elephant in the Laboratory: Women Scientists Speak Out
  • Author: Emily Monosson
  • ISBN: 9780801446641
  • Page: 441
  • Format: Hardcover
  • About half of the undergraduate and roughly 40 percent of graduate degree recipients in science and engineering are women As increasing numbers of these women pursue research careers in science, many who choose to have children discover the unique difficulties of balancing a professional life in these highly competitive and often male dominated fields with the demands oAbout half of the undergraduate and roughly 40 percent of graduate degree recipients in science and engineering are women As increasing numbers of these women pursue research careers in science, many who choose to have children discover the unique difficulties of balancing a professional life in these highly competitive and often male dominated fields with the demands of motherhood Although this issue directly affects the career advancement of women scientists, it is rarely discussed as a professional concern, leaving individuals to face the dilemma on their own.To address this obvious but unacknowledged crisis the elephant in the laboratory, according to one scientist Emily Monosson, an independent toxicologist, has brought together 34 women scientists from overlapping generations and several fields of research including physics, chemistry, geography, paleontology, and ecology, among others to share their experiences.From women who began their careers in the 1970s and brought their newborns to work, breastfeeding them under ponchos, to graduate students today, the authors of the candid essays written for this groundbreaking volume reveal a range of career choices the authors work part time and full time they opt out and then opt back in they become entrepreneurs and job share they teach high school and have achieved tenure.The personal stories that comprise Motherhood, the Elephant in the Laboratory not only show the many ways in which women can successfully combine motherhood and a career in science but also address and redefine what it means to be a successful scientist These valuable narratives encourage institutions of higher education and scientific research to accommodate the needs of scientists who decide to have children.Contributors A Pia Abola, biochemist, writer, and editor Caroline Cal Baier Anderson, University of Maryland, Balti Joan S Baizer, SUNY Buffalo Stefi Baum, Rochester Institute of Technology Aviva Brecher, U.S Department of Transportation, Volpe Center Cambridge, Massachusetts Teresa Capone Cook, American Heritage Academy Carol B de Wet, Franklin Marshall College Kimberly D Anna, University of Wisconsin Madison Anne Douglass, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Elizabeth Douglass, Scripps Institute of Oceanography Katherine Douglass, George Washington University Deborah Duffy, University of Pennsylvania Rebecca A Efroymson, U.S government research laboratory Suzanne Epstein, Food and Drug Administration Kim M Fowler, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Debra Hanneman, Whitehall Geogroup, Inc and Earthmaps Deborah Harris, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Andrea L Kalfoglou, University of Maryland, Balti County Marla S McIntosh, University of Maryland Marilyn Wilkey Merritt, George Washington University Emily Monosson, toxicologist and writer Heidi Newberg, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Rachel Obbard, British Antarctic Survey Catherine O Riordan, Consortium for Ocean Leadership Nanette J Pazdernik, independent author and molecular biologist Devin Reese, National Science Resources Center Marie Remiker pseudonym Deborah Ross, Indiana University Purdue University Fort Wayne Christine Seroogy, University of Wisconsin Madison Marguerite Toscano, independent geoscientist, writer, and editor Gina D Wesley Hunt, Montgomery College Theresa M Wizemann, Merck Co Inc Sofia Refetoff Zahed, University of Wisconsin Madison Gayle Barbin Zydlewski, Cove Brook Watershed Council and University of Maine

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      Published :2019-05-08T06:06:51+00:00


    About “Emily Monosson

    • Emily Monosson

      Emily Monosson Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Motherhood, the Elephant in the Laboratory: Women Scientists Speak Out book, this is one of the most wanted Emily Monosson author readers around the world.



    935 thoughts on “Motherhood, the Elephant in the Laboratory: Women Scientists Speak Out

    • I think that this topic deserves much more attention than it receives and am thrilled that such a useful book exists. Stories range from women scientists about to retire (my god, the crap they put up with) to women who are currently pursuing their PhDs. Sadly, the overall message confirmed my worst suspicions: the way to have kids and a career is to find a really awesome nanny and GOD HELP YOU if you actually take any time off after a baby is born. Regardless, the book offers a really fascinatin [...]


    • I absolutely LOVE this book! It's a life changer in terms of being excited about other women doing really great things with both their intellectual and personal lives. I can't express just how great this book is. Every female and male scientist interested in work life balance should read it for perspective.


    • I read this when my daughter was a baby and I was in grad school. It helped me get through the guilt of having a baby at that time, and helped me to realize that others have made parenting and science work together.


    • Read this with some of my classmates. Kind of stressful but a great and interesting read for women scientists, and good for women in any demanding job and for men!


    • This book is an excellent monograph, sharing several women's viewpoints, discussing the world of being a mother and being a scientist, both.


    • I was hoping for some stories about women who chose to work in industry, or who were returning to employment after "opting out" of a science career for a while. Perhaps on how they tried to stay current with their specialty. Cuz cutting edge science changes alot in 5 years. However, most of the stories are written by women in academia, and were not specific to science. Their peers in the English department have similar stories to tell. I definitely preferred Mama, PhD, which scored points for co [...]


    • Didn't reveal anything about balancing work and parenting I didn't already know, but that speaks to how far society has progressed--I've already weighed and considered the options open to me because they have been a part of the conversation of my growing up. It was shocking reading about the discrimination women faced, even in this decade.



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