Local Wonders: Seasons in the Bohemian Alps

Local Wonders Seasons in the Bohemian Alps Ted Kooser describes with exquisite detail and humor the place he calls home in the rolling hills of southeastern Nebraska an area known as the Bohemian Alps Nothing is too big or too small for his at

  • Title: Local Wonders: Seasons in the Bohemian Alps
  • Author: Ted Kooser
  • ISBN: 9780803278110
  • Page: 472
  • Format: Paperback
  • Ted Kooser describes with exquisite detail and humor the place he calls home in the rolling hills of southeastern Nebraska an area known as the Bohemian Alps Nothing is too big or too small for his attention Memories of his grandmother s cooking are juxtaposed with reflections about the old fashioned outhouse on his property When casting his eye on social progress, KoosTed Kooser describes with exquisite detail and humor the place he calls home in the rolling hills of southeastern Nebraska an area known as the Bohemian Alps Nothing is too big or too small for his attention Memories of his grandmother s cooking are juxtaposed with reflections about the old fashioned outhouse on his property When casting his eye on social progress, Kooser reminds us that the closing of local schools, thoughtless county weed control, and irresponsible housing development destroy than just the view In the end, what makes life meaningful for Kooser are the ways in which his neighbors care for one another and how an afternoon walking with an old dog, or baking a pie, or decorating the house for Christmas can summon memories of his Iowa childhood This writer is a seer in the truest sense of the word, discovering the extraordinary within the ordinary, the deep beneath the shallow, the abiding wisdom in the pithy Bohemian proverbs that are woven into his essays.

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      Published :2019-03-12T03:44:53+00:00


    About “Ted Kooser

    • Ted Kooser

      Ted Kooser lives in rural Nebraska with his wife, Kathleen, and three dogs He is one of America s most noted poets, having served two terms as U S Poet Laureate and, during the second term, he won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for his collection, DELIGHTS SHADOWS He is a retired life insurance executive who now teaches part time at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln The school board in Lincoln, Nebraska, recently opened Ted Kooser Elementary School, which Ted says is his greatest honor, among many awards and distinctions He has published twelve collections of poetry and three nonfiction books Two of the latter are books on writing, THE POETRY HOME REPAIR MANUAL and WRITING BRAVE AND FREE, and a memoir, LIGHTS ON A GROUND OF DARKNESS all from University of Nebraska Press BAG IN THE WIND from Candlewick is his first children s book, with which he is delighted It s wonderful, Ted said, to be writing for young people I am reinventing myself at age 70.



    551 thoughts on “Local Wonders: Seasons in the Bohemian Alps

    • I cannot think of any person who could possibly not love this bookBEFORE READING THD BOOK:This book grabbed my interest in a blink of an eye. Against all logical reasoning, I am putting it on the shelf from which I buy books. This is terribly out of character for me No, it does not take place in Czechoslovakia, but in fact in southeastern Nebraska. Many of the people living in this area were originally from Czechoslovakia. There are also many people of German descent. The author is the 13th Poet [...]


    • msarki.tumblr/post/8511893"In the end, what makes life meaningful for Kooser are the ways in which his neighbors care for one another and how an afternoon walking with an old dog, or baking a pie, or decorating the house for Christmas can summon memories of his Iowa childhood."___University of Nebraska Press/Bison Books These days my wife and I clean and clear out as much clutter as possible from our lives. I am still the biggest collector of the thousand or so books remaining in my possession. [...]


    • There is a quote on the cover of this book from Kooser's friend Jim Harrison: "The quietest magnificent book I've ever read." Brian and I have been reading this book aloud for the past year, and each time I'd put it back on the nightstand, I'd see that quote and think what a fitting description it was. I've always been a fan of Kooser's poetry, also for its quiet insights, so I was excited to read these essays. They are organized by season and range from observations of his rural Nebraskan neigh [...]


    • Random musings in prose from one of our best poets. He's the guy I'd like to be stranded with at a truckstop in a snowstorm. Interesting to read his prose, which is in parts lyrical, in parts elegant, and in parts reassuringly ordinary. Kooser words make me think of Andrew Wyeth's paintings, and sometimes even Edward Hopper's. There's that certain slant of light to nearly every page. He's got a fierce love of the land, in particular his own Nebraska soil, and of his neighbors who work that land. [...]



    • All of Kooser's work is excellent, and this book of short, vignette-style essays is no exception. Really, this book should be handed out in conjunction with tourism info through the Chamber of Commerce in Nebraska. Through the specific details of the four seasons in the "Bohemian Alps" in SE Nebraska, Kooser gets at a kind of universal sense of what it's like to live in the Great Plains.


    • Even though I've never visited Nebraska, I feel a bit more informed about the state and its inhabitants after reading this book. Also learned something about Iowa as well, another state that I have never set foot in


    • Every page wasn't over-the-top amazing imagery, but I certainly enjoyed it. A nice leisurely read and quiet book perfect for writing about Nebraska.




    • It took me a while to get the feel for this author's style. I read his poetry book this month and this book about his life (and the seasons) is in a poetry style. Which takes a bit of a mind turn for reading and comprehending. I enjoyed it but the first bit too a while for me to turn into. The author uses his present and the seasons to tell about his past and some of the stories he has gathered. As he passes through the seasons he remembers those who have passed from his life. There were lots of [...]


    • Poet (and Poet Laureate) Ted Kooser wrote this collection of prose pieces while in his early sixties, all of them appreciations of his daily life and memories of family going back to his boyhood in Ames, Iowa. Living today in a farmhouse near little Gardner, Nebraska, not far from Lincoln, he first describes the rolling terrain of the land and its Czech and Bohemian settlers, whose descendants continue to provide a cultural identity to the region. The essays are sprinkled with Czech and Bohemian [...]


    • This delightful little volume is well worth a subsequent listen. And its language is so engaging as to make me want to order a printed version so that I may go back and underline and highlight some passages that just demand more than a single look - which is the one down side of audio books that I have come to appreciate. When I first picked it up my first thought was, "On, another name for the Nebraska Sand Hills." But as I came to find out the Bohemian Alps are in the same state, but some dist [...]


    • Ted Kooser, former US Poet Laureate (2004-2006) has written a delightful book of life in the Bohemian Alps of Nebraska. Each of the vignettes started as a poem which was then expanded to be a story about life in the slow lane of rural Nebraska. All phases of live are here, the local rummage sales, the bank building being restored to a community center, moving the outhouse and his love of hardware stores and descriptions of his favorite sweater, preparing the garden plot and his concern about the [...]


    • A wonderful book of essays, I tried to read it very slowly to make it last but got carried away and finished it today.I especially enjoyed the bits about his family and relatives and most especially enjoyed his take on garage sales. He explains perfectly the draw of going to such sales, describing them as theater. I also loved the ending, metaphor is definitely his area.I was fortunate enough to take a class from Mr. Kooser a few weeks ago at Chautauqua, it was a lovely day.Also loved the title [...]


    • This is NE's One Book One Nebraska read in 2011. Luckily I had a close friend who went to the U of NE - Lincoln and introduced me to Kooser (and Kuzma and Kloepfkorn) back in the '70's - way before he became the US Poet Laureate. It helps to have lived in NE, and it definitely helps to know there are a lot of Czechs in NE. Kind of a journal of his musings through a year, each season gets about 35 pages. I find when he tries to achieve poetic insight within his prose that I tended to loose intere [...]


    • A beautiful little book full of reflections and observations about living in the Bohemian Alps of southeast Nebraska, and growing up in Ames Iowa. Kooser, former Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner for poetry crafts his stories to truly bring them to life. Divided into the four seasons of a year these stories of his life range from his childhood Christmases in Iowa to his current observations on county weed management along rural roads told with an equal vividness and interspersed with bits [...]


    • A church member loaned me this book by the former Poet Laureate. It is not a book of poems. It is gentle remarks on life in Nebraska hills. Gentle is a good word to describe it. And generous. Kooser observes each season and the people, nature, land, and culture around him. He remarks on events in his life, including a startling section on his cancer diagnosis.This is one of those books you have lying around and pick up and read a few pages every day or two, rather than reading large chunks in on [...]


    • Former US Poet Laureate Ted Kooser shares memories of his adult life in rural Nebraska and childhood in Iowa. His uncommon gift for observation is reflected in lyrical, understated essays, some only a paragraph long. These are full of quiet wisdom, conveying his affection for his family, friends, and neighbors. My fondness for the Midwest made me appreciate this book even more than I might have otherwise.


    • This is a book to go out and buy immediately. It was my introduction to Kooser, a former US poet laureate, and literally made me feel ashamed that I'd never heard of him. It is a wonderful book.I read it last February, home sick with a horrible fever. I started reading to keep me focused, and I can't help but think that this book made me well. I've re-read it several times since, and can't suggest it highly enough.


    • Written by an honored poet and former insurance company executive, this biography beautifully details the author's life in the low hills of southeastern Nebraska. Kooser is a master of writing big about small things - - "seeing small." Winner of the Nebraska Book Award for Nonfiction in 2003, Kooser was named the nation's poet laureate in October 2004 washingtonpost/wp-dyn/ (lj)


    • I don't know, I wanted to like this book but couldn't connect with it. Ted Kooser is a renowned poet, and the book is almost like a book of poetic prose. Normally I love poetic prose, but maybe with more emotional charge? Something in the narrator's voice kept me from loving this - there was a bit too much of "look at what a quirky old guy I am" to it. Or maybe I just don't have the attention span? I don't know - I didn't love it.


    • I like when Mr. Kooser gives himself more space for his metaphors - his prose sits better with me than his poetry some times does. And while maybe I can appreciate his wonderings of his local wonders because they are now my local wonders too, I do thing his mix of past and present musings relate well to slow living and appreciating the commonplace, almost meditative in a beautifully midwestern way.


    • I started reading this book the day of an ice storm, January 16, 2017, and as mentioned in the preface "the last glacier's death rattle was blowing down our necks.""Local Wonders: Seasons in the Bohemian Alps" is describing Ted Kooser's home place and life in southeastern Nebraska in an honest, witty and delightful way, often interspersed with a good sense of humor and Bohemian and Czech wisdoms. Absolutely loved it!


    • To quote Eloise, "OOOooooooooooooooooo! I absolutely love this book."I don't think Eloise would "get" this book, but I do. I grew up in Kansas and spent a lot of time visiting my grandparents and extended family in western Kansas. This book rings true - to the land and the people - to everything. It is one of those books that helps you see the world more clearly. I love to re-read it. I need to do it again soon.(His poetry is lovely too.)


    • I carry my marked up, post-it tagged, coffee stained copy with me everywhere because it truly is the one book I would need to have if ever I became stranded on a desert island. This is the book that is most like the people I love best: quietly and simply soulful, remarkable and deceptive in depth, and observing and considerate of those ordinary details that make up so many lives. A nearly perfect reading experience.


    • When this book was lent to me, I was not sure I wanted to read it. I also wasn't sure after reading the first twenty to thirty pages. Then, I just absolutely began to love it. I really enjoyed the anecdotes throughout, the pace of life, and the heartland stories. Kooser, a former US Poet Laureate, definitely has a way with words. I enjoyed his stories. I felt this story was the equivalent of a warm mug of cocoa or comfort food.


    • People these days often live lives divocred from nature, walled off in the climate controlled comfort of home, office and automobile from the rhythm of sun, moon and the seasons. Ted Kooser reminds us that these are things that give meaning to life, that deserve observation and celebration.This is a wonderful journal of thoughtful essays.


    • I liked and disliked. Some of it was beautiful and eloquent. Some of it was quintessential Nebraskan. But some of it seemed perverse Ike fingering a goose to determine his/her gender. Really, why do we need to do that to a scared animal? And the rambling on for quite a length about his outdoor toilet.Not very interesting. His description of the seasons was superb.


    • Ted Kooser's account of life in the hills (the Bohemian Alps, centered on Prague NE) of southeastern Nebraska is a wonderful set of essays. The very last essay ("Life is a long walk forward through the crowded cars of a passenger train . . .") is heart-brakingly perfect as a description of life's meaning and challenges. Though prose, it is poetry.


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