Living on the Volcano: The Secrets of Surviving as a Football Manager

Living on the Volcano The Secrets of Surviving as a Football Manager A man punches the wall in a strategic show of anger Another complains he has become a stranger to those he loves A third relies on my three a day coffee Nurofen and a bottle of wine Yet another admit

  • Title: Living on the Volcano: The Secrets of Surviving as a Football Manager
  • Author: Michael Calvin
  • ISBN: 9781780893273
  • Page: 453
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A man punches the wall in a strategic show of anger Another complains he has become a stranger to those he loves A third relies on my three a day coffee, Nurofen and a bottle of wine Yet another admits he is an oddity, who would prefer to be working in cricket A fifth describes his professional life as a circus These are football managers, live and uncut ArseneA man punches the wall in a strategic show of anger Another complains he has become a stranger to those he loves A third relies on my three a day coffee, Nurofen and a bottle of wine Yet another admits he is an oddity, who would prefer to be working in cricket A fifth describes his professional life as a circus These are football managers, live and uncut Arsene Wenger likens the job to living on a volcano any day may be your last He speaks with the authority of being the longest serving manager in the English game, having been at Arsenal for 17 years The average lifespan of a Football League manager is 17 months Fifty three managers, across all four Divisions, were sacked, or resigned, in the 2012 13 season There were fifty seven managerial changes in the 2013 14 season What makes these men tick They are familiar figures, who rarely offer anything than a glimpse into their personal and professional lives What shapes them How and why do they do their job Award winning writer Michael Calvin provides the answers.Insecurity is a unifying factor, but managers at different levels face different sets of problems Depending on their status, they are dealing with multi millionaires, or mortgage slaves Living on the Volcano charts the progress of than 20 managers, in different circumstances and in different phases of their career Some, like Brendan Rodgers and Roberto Martinez, are at the peak of their profession Others, like Chris Hughton, Brian McDermott and Gary Waddock, have been sacked, and are seeking a way back into the game They offer a unique insight into a trade which is prone to superficial judgement and savage swings in fortune Management requires ruthlessness and empathy, idealism and cunning Stories overlap, experiences intermingle, and myths are exposed.

    • ☆ Living on the Volcano: The Secrets of Surviving as a Football Manager || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Michael Calvin
      453 Michael Calvin
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Living on the Volcano: The Secrets of Surviving as a Football Manager || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Michael Calvin
      Posted by:Michael Calvin
      Published :2019-04-18T02:43:56+00:00


    About “Michael Calvin

    • Michael Calvin

      Michael Calvin Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Living on the Volcano: The Secrets of Surviving as a Football Manager book, this is one of the most wanted Michael Calvin author readers around the world.



    130 thoughts on “Living on the Volcano: The Secrets of Surviving as a Football Manager

    • Michael Calvin examines the stresses of modern football management by conducting in-depth interviews with managers at every level of the English football Pyramid. One of the better football books I have read, I was expecting something completely different, this was an intriguing surprise. I can't wait to see The subject of Calvin's next peek behind the curtain!


    • I am not a real big sports person (suprise)I come from an area that sports mostly consist of American football, baseball and basketball. So, always being the one who wanted to be out there, when I finally got into watching and being a fan of sports, I fell in love with hockey and recently soccer.Why? mostly because of the passion and sheer borderline insanity fans have for their teams and clubs, Mr Calvin's book is a interesting well written book into a job that has to be maddening, nerve wracki [...]


    • Ultimately a little disappointing. Calvin is as good a football journo as there is and the writing is a cut above while the central message - the ridiculously short time that managers have to make an impact - is even more relevant today than it was on publication not quite a year ago. But the problem with access is there - Calvin cannot be brutal about his subjects, all of whom have been willing and kind enough to give him house room -so the genuinely excellent are confused with those who probab [...]


    • Michael Calvin does it again!After winning The Times Sports Book Awards for "The Nowhere Men" about scouts and scouting in football, he takes a deep look at managing and managers in football.Living on the Volcano is a inside look of how it is to be a manager in english football. Calvin get precoius time from a bunch of managers in the game. Managers at different levels, ages and with different takes on managing, life and football.Odds should be low on Calvin winning more awards. Thumbs up!


    • I think this may be even better than Nowhere Men. Calvin combines the thoroughness of the good journalist with worldly insight and this makes him not only worth reading but also worth paying attention to. He seems to me to have a better grasp of the changes (real and apparent) in football than most of his peers.I don't often use post-its when reading my annual pile of Christmas sports books but this one is liberally decorated with the colourful tabs.


    • If the book was about three quarters of the length, and all chapters were as good as the Sean Dyche one, this would be a masterpiece. If there's one theme running through this it's: Alan Pardew is brilliant. I don't like to throw around a term like this but Sean Dyche is a fucking legend.


    • Football has, in recent times, become an even bigger phenomenon - not that you'd think such a thing could be possible.As well as a "24 hour" news channel, two companies pushing it down our throats as much as possible, it being used to drive web traffic and endless autobiographies we now have a whole raft of books analysing the damn thing.Hats off to Michael Calvin, then, for finding something slightly different to talk about. Managers themselves have written out their lives in the game, the stre [...]


    • More of a collection of interviews really - which isn't to take away from the validity of the subject matter or the insight into a realm of the sport that is so Alcatraz-lock-down sealed off - but it can feel a smidge surface-based at times. While it does show managers frequently lambasted and satirised for their media personalities in a more human light (which is so, so important in an age when everybody has an opinion on things they have no idea about) each chapter-cum-interview was only about [...]


    • An interesting look into the minds of football coaches , some great insights , and just to show how much pressure these guys are under , this book was written 2 years ago , and only 2 of the managers in it are still at the clubs


    • Great insight into the day to day lives of football managers and the stress and pressure they have to deal with. While it's full of minute details it can seem a bit disjointed at times as focus shifts from manager to manager mid narrative. It's still a worthwhile read.


    • A decent book on the trials and tribulations of being a football manager.So many sports books are ghost written flimsy nonsense and this book is far, far better than that.He does shed light on the crazy and ruthless world of management and the impact it can have on some individuals.However, the problem is, of course, many managers (and those looking for work) are unwilling to speak candidly about the role because it might impinge their chances of getting another job.There is an element of this h [...]


    • An interesting read, in a book whose selling point was also what left me wanting more.First off, the depth and breadth of the interviews is excellent, and Calvin's journalistic skill is evident in the number of high profile managers who were prepared to be interviewed for this book, such as Alan Pardew, Brendan Rodgers and Mark Hughes, down to Gareth Ainsworth and Micky Adams. Calvin also leaves the story to be told by the managers themselves and doesn't seek to shape the narrative - most of the [...]


    • I guess it's a series of long interviews (which have probably appeared, edited, in Michael Calvin's Sunday paper) but they're quite neatly wrapped in the "survival" theme, with its multiple implications: job retention, the managers' family lives, sense of perspective and mental health.I appreciate how it lets the managers speak for themselves. That's the kind of writing I prefer - it doesn't irritate by jumping to conclusions or the journalist sticking his oar in after every sentence. It's enlig [...]


    • The job of a football manager is not as easy at it may sound. The modern day football clubs treat their manages as any other profession, instant hiring, instant firing. Michael Calvin who impressed lover of sports as well as readers with his book The Nowhere Men which was about scouts and scouting. Well this one is about managers.The book starts with Arsene Wenger’s forward and then each chapter is based on a different manager in which the does most of the speaking. The book is written in the [...]


    • The most enjoyable part of the book isThe genuine sense of what it feels like to be a football manager day in day out, both good and bad. The sacrifices made to their home life, the sense of responsibility and the loneliness and yet like the PC game of the same name management appears to be utterly addictive. Loved the Sean Dyce and Eddie Howe chapters The most important part of the book isMartin Ling's honesty about his nervous breakdown where he thought he was going to die when there was nothi [...]


    • An interesting read for the most part on the inside track of life in football management; the manager's varying methods, coping mechanisms, etc, but I struggle to see how this book is an award nominee.Manager quotes take up 90% of each chapter with not a great deal of insight from the author in between apart which I found rather lazy, the author's overly descriptive language was pretentious and quite irritating by the end too unfortunately.Don't like to be too critical as it was insightful; midd [...]


    • Calvin is a decent writer and the stresses and strains of football management should make for a great topic but this wasn't quite the book it could have been. Perhaps if it wasn't organised around particular managers, in the way that each chapter is devoted to one or more managers serving in the English game, Calvin could have really got underneath the subject's skin but as it was it felt rather fragmented.


    • Reading this certainly makes you wonder who would want to be a football manager. Plenty do and keep going back, even after being sacked ruthlessly by their club. The stresses and pressures of football managers are all here - often embellished by a selection of manager's thoughts, including Brendan Rodgers and Roberto Martinez. A very good read (as are his other books), although a little light on analysis.


    • Really enjoyed this book. A very interesting glimpse into the world of management and some characters in the game who are definitely not what you would expect. I particularly liked the parts related to the camaraderie of managers who don't take it personally when an old mate ends up with their job after the inevitable sack.


    • There's lot of interesting stuff in here on the nature of management and modern football but much of the content is verbatim reporting of the particular manager's words so it can feel a bit samey at times


    • Interesting insight to the world of football managementGreat book very well written. Bit of a slow start but stick with it you will be rewarded with interesting tales from various figures from the world of football management.




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