Wintering Out

Wintering Out Seamus Heaney has gone beyond the themes of his earlier poetry and has made the giant step towards the most ambitious most intractable themes of maturity The power of this book comes from a sense tha

  • Title: Wintering Out
  • Author: Seamus Heaney
  • ISBN: 9780571101580
  • Page: 386
  • Format: Paperback
  • Seamus Heaney has gone beyond the themes of his earlier poetry and has made the giant step towards the most ambitious, most intractable themes of maturity The power of this book comes from a sense that he is reaching out towards a type of desolation and of isolation without which no imagination can be seen to have grown up Eavan Boland, Irish Times Keyed and pitched un Seamus Heaney has gone beyond the themes of his earlier poetry and has made the giant step towards the most ambitious, most intractable themes of maturity The power of this book comes from a sense that he is reaching out towards a type of desolation and of isolation without which no imagination can be seen to have grown up Eavan Boland, Irish Times Keyed and pitched unlike any other significant poet at work in the language anywhere Harold Bloom, Times Literary Supplement

    • Best Read [Seamus Heaney] ↠ Wintering Out || [Ebooks Book] PDF ´
      386 Seamus Heaney
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Seamus Heaney] ↠ Wintering Out || [Ebooks Book] PDF ´
      Posted by:Seamus Heaney
      Published :2019-07-25T08:43:29+00:00


    About “Seamus Heaney

    • Seamus Heaney

      Seamus Justin Heaney was an Irish poet, writer and lecturer from County Derry, Ireland He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995, for works of lyrical beauty and ethical depth, which exalt everyday miracles and the living past Heaney on.



    594 thoughts on “Wintering Out

    • Of the many forms that musical compositions can take—the sonata, the rondo, the passacaglia, etc.—the intermezzo has historically been a subordinate form. A step-cousin to its other, more sophisticated and substantial forms, the intermezzo—as it name suggests—often functions as a 'bridging' piece snuck in in between larger, more substantive movements (in instrumental compositions, such as Shostakovich's String Quartet No. 15), or in between one signature aria and the next (in an opera). [...]


    • A number of poems in this volume offer a reverent and altogether euphoric interaction with the natural landscape of Ireland. Other pieces are mournful and give homage to the past, while also expressing shame and fury at atrocities committed. Many poems are addressed to individuals. These verses capture each person’s connection to the land or to his/her trade and labor. With this volume, Heaney establishes himself as the bard of Ireland. He has a gifted eye for observing the landscape and its p [...]


    • Heaney's third collection, in line with the first two, absolutely full of beautifully crafted poems. Great pictures of the Irish rural life, full of rural vocabulary, these poems make the very ground come alive. "Land" and "Gifts of Rain" rank among my all time favorite poems.


    • who reads into distance reads | beyond us going through seamus heaney's publications in chronological order feels like an exploration unto a man's evolution. which is something very fortunate to experience when you can realise you will like the end products from the beginning as much as you have liked those at the end. and even more so when you consider your favourite collection (Death of a Naturalist) so far was his very first one. sometimes, doing something like this can backfire--i would prob [...]


    • This complex volume of short poems beings with harvest and ends with Good Friday, literally over-wintering through its contents. Less immediately accessible than the earthy 'Death of a Naturalist', this is perhaps a more ambitious book: an attempt to create a definitively Irish aesthetic, somewhere between old history and James Joyce. As Heaney is such a physical writer, this takes the form of a 'tongue', formed from the sounds of words such as 'Anahorish' or 'Broagh' and rooted in specific plac [...]


    • Seamus Heaney's third collection, first published in 1972, spends much of its winter journey in a landscape familiar from his earlier books. Rural Ireland, its fields and bogs, hedgerows and legends, is marvellously and evocatively brought to life. Heaney, though, had spent a year in California while writing this book and there's the sense of new horizons opening too in this book. It also contains one of my favourite Heaney poems, The Tollund Man, the first of a number of great poems that Heaney [...]


    • Besides 3 or 4 very good poems, this is a dull outing by Heaney's standards. Formally and thematically repetitive, the collection soon feels merely descriptive, producing pleasant, hollow music.


    • Having heard much ado about Seamus Heaney I thought I would try some of his stuff. Unfortunately, I had trouble seeing any value in it whatsoever. He relies too heavily on a structure that lends nothing to his poems. He doesn't write with any of the melody or lyricism of the great poets, and he doesn't have the awe-inspiring passionate writing of say a Ginsberg. "Wintering Out" falls flat with me, and pretty much bored me to tears.


    • With all the images transformed into landscape, I would say this is Heaney's prelude to North. But that's only becausee North is a superior book and deserves a prelude.


    • Highlights: Land; Gifts of Rain; Broagh; The Backward Look; The Other Side; The Wool Trade; Midnight; The Tollund Man; Summer Home; Good-Night


    • A good book, but not as gripping as his first two books. I still love the spondees and enjambments that make his lines so full.



    • I have no idea why the author for this collection of poems is listed as "anonymous" by . It's Séamus Heaney. The poems are a mixed bunch, but overall worth recommending.



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