In Their Own Voices: Transracial Adoptees Tell Their Stories

In Their Own Voices Transracial Adoptees Tell Their Stories Nearly forty years after researchers first sought to determine the effects if any on children adopted by families whose racial or ethnic background differed from their own the debate over transraci

  • Title: In Their Own Voices: Transracial Adoptees Tell Their Stories
  • Author: Rita James Simon Rhonda M. Roorda
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 376
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Nearly forty years after researchers first sought to determine the effects, if any, on children adopted by families whose racial or ethnic background differed from their own, the debate over transracial adoption continues In this collection of interviews conducted with black and biracial young adults who were adopted by white parents, the authors present the personal storNearly forty years after researchers first sought to determine the effects, if any, on children adopted by families whose racial or ethnic background differed from their own, the debate over transracial adoption continues In this collection of interviews conducted with black and biracial young adults who were adopted by white parents, the authors present the personal stories of two dozen individuals who hail from a wide range of religious, economic, political, and professional backgrounds How does the experience affect their racial and social identities, their choice of friends and marital partners, and their lifestyles In addition to interviews, the book includes overviews of both the history and current legal status of transracial adoption.

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      Published :2019-05-04T07:02:54+00:00


    About “Rita James Simon Rhonda M. Roorda

    • Rita James Simon Rhonda M. Roorda

      Rita James Simon Rhonda M. Roorda Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the In Their Own Voices: Transracial Adoptees Tell Their Stories book, this is one of the most wanted Rita James Simon Rhonda M. Roorda author readers around the world.



    656 thoughts on “In Their Own Voices: Transracial Adoptees Tell Their Stories

    • If you are in a transracial family or thinking about becoming one through adoption, this is a MUST READ for you. Here is our review from a previous blog post: We have read a great book called In Thier Own Voices by Simon and Rhoorda. It is a compilation of testimonies from transracially adopted children and has many statistics comparing these children with children raised by same race parents. Here are some of the findings in this book: * The quality of parenting was more important than whether [...]


    • This book was such a disappointment. In part, that's due to its age. Published in 2000, the authors conducted interviews with 24 participants about their experiences being adopted into a family of another race. The interviews were done between 1996-98, and the participants ranged in age from 22-31 (with one outlier at 57). So, the interviews were with people who largely came of age in the late-70s to mid-80s. We're not there yet, but we've certainly come a long way since then, and some of the is [...]


    • The book is a collection of twenty-four interviews (twelve men, twelve women) of biracial and black adults who were adopted by white parents. Unquestionably worth the read for anyone interested in the topic. While there are recurring themes in the responses of the interviewees, nothing is redundant: each individual adds another layer to the reader's understanding. I especially enjoyed reading those highly self-aware adoptees who were able to explain how their own personalities molded their exper [...]


    • The stories of the adoptees were very powerful. It was insightful from both the standpoint of being adopted as well as being biracial. I would strongly suggest this book to people looking to adopt or be foster parents, as well as educators and counselors who deal with mentoring children. I have been contemplating fostering children and this book opened my eyes to preparing to be a foster/adoptive parent. My only concern from what little I know about psyc. studies was that the interviewer was not [...]


    • I read this book on the recommendation of a friend and found it to be an excellent book. I gave this book four stars, but it's the first book I've ever read on adoption or transracial adoption, so it's possible that I'll move it up a star when I have other books to compare it to. The reason why I gave it four stars instead of five is because it is definitely speaking from and to the American perspective -- and in particular a black American perspective (all of the interviewees were black or mixe [...]


    • Editorial Reviews:"This book is the story of every person who has lived in an environment in which he or she didn't quite fit Yet, while the stories in the book are universal, they are also deeply personal and incredibly touching. You cannot read this book without being changed." -- Lifelines "Extremely informative and emotionally compelling." -- Social Work in Health CareIn Their Own Voices sheds light on a very complex and controversial debate. The debate would be richer and wiser if those who [...]


    • A really engaging read, and highly recommended for anybody involved with transracial adoption. There is some brief material to introduce and summarize this book, but the majority is transcripts of interviews with adult transracial adoptees, reflecting on their experiences and struggles and family lives. Practically the whole book is people's personal stories, which made it very readable and compelling for me. The individuals in this book were interviewed as adults in the late 90s and had been ad [...]


    • The introduction of this book describes and reports on the major findings of a number of studies conducted on white families who adopted children with racial and ethnic backgrounds different than their own and summarizes the ongoing debate between those who support and those who oppose transracial adoption. This is followed by a collection of interviews of transracial adoptees describing their experiences. I thought this book offered an excellent and reasonably unbiased view of both the benefits [...]


    • I thought this was a really interesting book. It interviewed several transracial adoptees that were born in the early 70's. It was interesting to read their accounts. I would like to read an updated book with adoptees that were adopted in the 90's. I imagine that the stories will have changed in that time. By reading the book, I realized that I need to make a greater effort to expose my children to diversity.


    • This has been my go-to book throughout my adoption journey, which started 13 years ago. While it may be a little dated, it opened my eyes to things that as a Caucasian person, I would not have realized.


    • Excellent book on transracial adoption. I would highly recommend for anyone who is considering adopting transracially or who has the joy of having a transracial family!



    • Adults who were adopted transracially share their stories. VERY insightful and interesting. Highly recommend for families who choose to adopt transracially.


    • Series of interviews with adoptees, they offer advice for adoptive parents and tell their stories. Excellent book!


    • I suggested this book for our clinical society's book club because I hoped it would prove a valuable resource for therapists, social workers and others who often encounter transracially adoptive families in their work. The adoptees whose stories make up the bulk of the book each have had their own experiences with growing up black in a white family, and now have varying levels of insight into the effects of these experiences as they consider the benefits and challenges of their adoptions. For me [...]


    • This book was a study of children who have been adopted transracially. It provided statistical details on the children's adjustment throughout their childhood, as well as interviews with a variety of boys and girls who grew up in a transracial family.The book clearly stated the perspectives of those who are opposed to transracial as well as those who accept white people adopting children of other races, without making a determination on which side of the fence was "right".Though I found the inte [...]


    • Being my first book I have read on the topic of transracial adoption, I thought that In Their Own Voices was quiet insightful. In Their Own Voices however was published in the year 2000, and I would be interested to see if the same age group was interviewed today, if 15 years of change in society would make a difference in their responses. I was happy to read that the majority of the men and women had a positive experience being adopted into a transracial family and that they felt safe, loved, a [...]


    • This book started by completely freaking me out by stating all the opposition to trans-racial adoptions and their reasons for opposing it--and there is quite a bit out there. Which scared to me death and made me wonder why we had made this decision to adopt from Ethiopia. Then if followed that up by going over all the statistics and support for trans-racial adoptions. This made me feel a little better. Following all this were interviews of people who were adopted into trans-racial families. The [...]


    • I ended up just sort of skimming this one. I've read Rita Simon's follow up to this book, "In Their Parent's Voices," which was great. This book is the transcripts from Simon's interviews with adult transracial adoptees, discussing their experiences and perspectives. The follow up book is interviews with these same adoptees parents. Both books are good reads for anyone interested in learning more about the firsthand experiences of transracial adoptive families. However, the format can get a litt [...]


    • After reading this book I find myself actually more confused about race than ever. I personally don't see race, but I do find one's heritage very important, no matter your color. No matter if the child I adopt is white, black, international, domestic, or even purple with red spots, I would make it a priority to help my child become acquainted and proud of his heritage while seeing that God made all of us equally able to be whomever we want to be. However, maybe there is something I'm missing, so [...]


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